Boston Marathon Recap: Mile 21

I’ve watched and participated in many triathlons and road races before, however watching the Boston Marathon was different. And it was especially different from last year’s race.

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Runners coming down the infamous “Heartbreak Hill”- arguably the most challenging segment of the course.

 

It seemed that each runner was running for a common purpose: to show that Boston is stronger than ever. The energy around the course was one of unity and pride. The spectators cheered louder and watched the race longer. It was truly incredible to be able to be present for such a defining moment in America’s history.

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The women elite runners.

Watching the elite runner go by was incredible. I am always baffled by their endurance, for I cannot even run 1/26 of their race at the same speed. However, the most inspiring moment of that day was watching Rick and Dick Hoyt (Team Hoyt) run past me.

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Team Hoyt passing through Boston College.

The Hoyts are from the Boston area and are familiar faces in the endurance sports scene. Rick is handicapped and in a wheelchair, so Dick, his father, pushes him throughout the entire race. They have been racing for the past 37 years and together they have competed in over 1,000 races (including 6 Ironmans). This race was the last one they’d do together, as Dick is now 73 and Rick 52.

Last year Dick came to my school and spoke about how anything is possible. Team Hoyt’s motto is: CAN. They have made incredible strides in the endurance world and continue to inspire individuals around the world. Take a moment to watch this video. I cry every time, which really means something because I never cry (ask Caity).

Watching the 2014 Boston Marathon was an inspiring day to say the least! What’s your favorite race to watch or compete in?

Look out for a blog post soon from two YoungTri members who ran the race!

-Kaitlin

Race Backpacks

Race T-Shirts are awesome, but race backpacks… even better :)

I wear my Ironman Lake Placid backpack every day to class! My family (aunt, uncles, cousin, dad) all have the same backpacks, so we always have to be careful when we’re together to not mix them up lol.

My IMLP backpack is huuuuge and fits so much! Love it :)

Who else uses theirs all the time?!

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Tri Hard,

Caity

#BostonStrong

Gorgeous day in Boston for the marathon – and an amazing atmosphere.

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More tomorrow :)

If you enjoyed marathon Monday today in Boston, tell us about your experience! Info@youngtri.com

Shifting Outdoor to Indoor this Crazy Spring

How has this crazy spring weather affected your training? For those of you lucky enough to be in more temparate climates… I. AM. SO. JEALOUS. The crazy spring has definitelycaused some major shifts in my routine!

…it went from mid 70s to mid 40s in one day here in Cambridge! Snow in late April! Ahhh!!

finally going to be warm next week! (let's hope it stays this way!)

finally going to be warm next week! (let’s hope it stays this way!)

I’ve had to stick to a lot more indoor workouts… which has been a bit frustrating, but I’ve made it work. I’ve been doing a lot more weight training as a result :)

My normal indoor routine is as follows:

Cardio 6-90 min (Stride Master, Running, Biking, Swimming)

Core 15-45 min (usually this set)

Weights / Squats – usually with combined 35ish lbs (about 150-200 squats)

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Weights & Core at the Harvard gym!

What’s your indoor workout routine? Have you had to shift your workout schedule at all this spring?

Tri Hard,

Caity

 

 

Favorite Runs: Olivia

As runners, we all know that feeling when you know that you had one of your best runs ever. There are always those runs where you just have to trudge through to get the miles down and workout done, but when everything falls into place, there is no better feeling. We chase (literally) the pure joy that comes with those beyond perfect runs. Here is my list of my top 4 runs:

1. Just today was probably my favorite run ever. I ran along the bay in Portland, Maine and the ocean smell, sunset, and view was too great to put into words. Everything fell into place, and it was just awesome.

2. This was a run on a sunday night during cross country. I dragged myself out of the house, but once I started running, I felt like I could run forever. (if you couldn’t tell, I love these sunset runs)

3. A run with my good friend, Sarah. I couldn’t have been happier running. I loved talking about great things and spending time with her.

4. A run in the rain along part of the Lake Placid Ironman Course. The rain made it feel pretty awesome, and running on the same course as ironmen is pretty awesome. I felt better than I had the season so far, and we all know that that’s the best feeling ever.

What runs have made your list of your favorite runs??

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Remembering the Marathon

Exactly one year ago, the unthinkable happened.

A holiday in the city of Boston became a day marred by tragedy.

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Me and my friends the morning of the marathon last year.

Marathon Monday, as the Bostonians call it, is one of the biggest days of the year in Beantown. The race has traditionally fallen on Patriot’s Day, so most schools in the area have the day off. My university is located at Mile 21 of the marathon, and most students wake up at 7am (which is extremely early for a typical college student) to begin celebrating the iconic race.

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Me, Stephanie, and Kelly cheering on runners.

Around 2:45pm, I was playing corn hole at my friend’s house along the course of the race. People came out to the deck where I was and rushed me inside. As I reentered the house, everyone was silent and staring at the TV. I was puzzled to why everyone’s spirits had so quickly faded. As I began to piece together what had happened, tears began to roll down my cheeks. My good friend, along with many other BC students, had just jumped into the marathon at mile 21 to run the remaining 5 miles. Thankfully everyone I personally knew was safe; however, that was not the case for all. Three people died and 264 were injured.

As a triathlete, as a runner, that day’s events really hit me hard. A sport that I loved so much was hurting. Many of my fellow runners had taken their last steps.

Copley Square; a place I visited regularly to eat dinner, shop, and even just to walk around; was now a memorial. How could such a great event turn into one of chaos and sorrow?

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A small piece of the infinite amount of flowers in Copley Square a few weeks after the marathon.

The way the city of Boston came together was amazing to watch. Directly following the bombings, many bystanders risked their lives to tend to the injured. Citizens who lived near the race course welcomed runners into their homes to keep them safe. Policemen worked day and night to ensure the safety of the people.

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Kam, Alex, me, and Romée celebrating Boston following the capture of the terrorist. Everyone on campus wore red, white and blue that night.

The days following Marathon Monday were very sad, yet incredibly inspiring. Everyone here was so proud to live in such a unique, historic city. There’s something special about Boston that words cannot describe. There is just so much love for this city. The Bostonians are strong, tough, and brave. They love their sports, their food, their history, and most importantly their freedom. Despite only living in Boston for less than two years, I feel an incredible connection to this area of the country and I will always consider it my second home.

So keep running, Boston, as you have been doing. This is our city and we decide how to run it.

-Kaitlin