Sunny March Run: Finally!

Today was a gorgeous day for an outside run. 60 degrees in Cambridge — what more could I ask for?!

It was one of those runs where things just clicked – no stomach or nutrition issues, and I really was able to get into the zone. Running along the Charles River is super relaxing and scenic (see the pictures below), and kept me motivated along the way. USAT Collegiate Nationals (in Arizona!) is in less than a month — so I’m trying to get in as many quality runs as I can before the big day!

Fun 10k run, sunny day, and signs of spring everywhere (ahem, melting river) made for a great day. I was even able to do a second workout later in the day with Ambassador Brittany, who stopped by Harvard!

Here’s to spring coming sooner & more quality training days like these!

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Perfect day for a run in Boston!

 

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Trails along the river

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Melt river, melt!

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Boston skyline selfie… haha

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Sunny day run 🙂

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Ambassador Brittany stopped by for a PM workout!

How’s your training going? Is your big “beginning of the season” event coming up soon (like nationals, Boston Marathon, etc.)? 

Tri Hard,

Caity

 

An Indoor Biker’s Guide Against Boredom

Bike shoes, bike gloves, that thing that holds the front tires, and …Netflix? 

A two hour bike on a trainer can be quite monotonous. The same motion over and over — sometimes at the same cadence and speed for long periods of time. It can get boring. There is not a crowd cheering you on or interesting trees or street signs to keep your mind on anything but the bike.

When biking outside, this is not as big of an issue. For one, you have to remain focused to be safe. Not only that, but the world that is whizzing by is often interesting enough to entertain.

When biking inside, on the other hand, boredom is a large issue. Some people turn to music. Some people turn to listening to books. And some people watch tv. Unfortunately for me, there is not very often a good show on when I am biking, and there is only so much “on demand”.

My solution? A stool, my laptop, some headphones, and a Netflix account. Two hours doesn’t seem so long when I’m watching my favorite show or movie. An action movie can make me increase my speed just as much as any pump up song. My favorite character running from an explosion is enough to keep me going. Even just a sitcom is enough for me.

Movies = Instant Workout Motivators

Movies = Instant Workout Motivators

When it comes to biking, music doesn’t have to be the only thing coming out of your headphones.

Stay Classy YoungTri,

TJ

#YoungTri: Favorite Member Photos This Week

Some of our favorite #youngtri pictures this week…

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YoungTri Ambassador Jessica at Tufts after swimming with the MIT Tri Team!

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Tara submitted this picture on Instagram of her daughter – so cute! Future triathlete 🙂

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Ambassador Zoey from Washington’s post mini-triathlon reward this week!

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Ambassador Brittany from NJ’s warm outside Sunday ride! Mid 50s in New Jersey in February!

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Ambassador Kasey from TX waking himself up with a sunny morning run!

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David submitted this – so funny (and accurate)

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Ambassador Liv from NJ after reading & riding for an hour! Got a good bit of studying and working out in – wahoo!

Submit your photos by using #youngtri on Instagram! (or email info@youngtri.com)

 

Getting Into the Zone

This is a post from YoungTri Contributor Patrick LaBrode. Patrick is a Sophomore on the University of Texas at Austin Swim Team.

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In the Zone at UT!

Being an endurance athlete is the furthest thing from easy! We (triathletes, distance runners/swimmers, and cyclists) have to spend many long and grueling hours training a week for a race that could 1 hour to 12+ hours. Although endurance training seems impossible, once you “get in the zone” you can feel like you never want to stop!

I myself am a distance swimmer (swimming the 1650, 1000 and 500) and I have competed in many triathlons. So many of my friends and family members ask me “how do you do it?”

They are stunned when I tell them I swam 9,000+ yards (around 5 miles) in one practice. And the only response I have is that “I get in my zone and just go.” Getting in the zone is something hard to explain to people outside of the “endurance sports world”. All of the sprinters on my team say if they were given a long-distance set, they’d get extremely bored and tired and give up. But what is different about us endurance athletes is the ability to get into that distance “zone”.

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Getting into my zone consists of me catching the right stroke rhythm. When this happens, my stroke seems in sync with my breath and my kick. I feel the pull of the water with every stroke and my stroke feels strong and relaxed. As my strokes begins to get in the right rhythm, I also might sing a song in my head that fits the speed/rhythm I want to achieve in my workout. Once everything is together, you feel it, and then you just keep going until the end of the workout or set.

As I’m in my zone, I also like to focus on what’s ahead of me. Is there a turn coming up? How long have I gone? What is my pace? All of these questions help yourself stay focused on the present workout and keep your mind from wondering.

So, next time you’re headed out to the track, road, pool treadmill, trainer, etc. try to think about your body and mind getting into the zone to maintain consistency and keep focused. It’s a great habit/tactic that distance athletes have, so use it!

-Patrick

Tri Treat: Quinoa & Kale “Burgers”!

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YT Ambassador Brittany made these “burgers” for a healthy & yummy post workout snack!

Thanks so much to YoungTri Ambassador Brittany for sharing this yummy recipe with us! She paired it with cauliflauer… yum! A great post-workout meal.

Here’s what you’ll need to make your own (makes 10 patties):

Cheese and egg are optional!

  • 2 ½ c cooked quinoa, cooled
  • 4 c kale, cleaned, deveined, chopped small
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ yellow onion, diced small
  • ½ c chives, chopped
  • ½ c Parmesan, grated
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¾ c finely ground bread crumbs (use gluten free breadcrumbs to make this dish gluten free)
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil plus more for frying

Put it all together!

  1. Combine quinoa, eggs, Parmesan, chives and salt in medium mixing bowl.
  2. Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in skillet on medium heat then sweat onions and garlic, approximately 3 minutes. Add kale to skillet and cook until kale is bright green and soft.
  3. Add kale mixture to quinoa mixture, then add breadcrumbs and stir to combine.
  4. Place clean skillet on medium heat and add enough oil to coat bottom of pan.
  5. Form patties using ½ c of quinoa mixture and place patties in skillet being careful not to splash hot oil or overcrowd the pan. Fry until golden brown on each side, approximately 5 minutes per side.
  6. Remove patties, drain on paper towel and serve.

Check out Cheryl Style for the original recipe and for an instructional cooking video!

Thanks again for sharing, Brittany! Yum!

Tri Hard,

Caity

 

 

“You’re ONE Workout Away From a Better Mood.”

I found this quote this week — and it COULD NOT be more accurate. Last week, I found myself super stressed and not in the best of moods in general. I was finding it quite difficult to get out the door and work out.

But, I began to realize as the week went on that as tough as it was to get back into a normal workout routine after being sick/injured, workouts are the best mood enhancers.

I noticed that I felt a lot happier and less stressed after each workout. Of course this feeling isn’t especially new, I just noticed its positive effects especially in my last few bikes and runs this week 🙂 .

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Truth.

Take a moment this week to use your workouts to channel all the stress and negative energy that has been bottling up inside of you. Let go and PUSH. Feel that endorphin release — and enjoy it.

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YoungTri Ambassador Luke killin’ it on the treadmill!

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YoungTri Ambassador Zoey all smiles after her indoor workout!

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Workout selfie – Harvard tri girls take the gym! Better moods as a result!

Do you find that training is a way to put you in a better mood?

Tri Hard,

Caity


Standing on the Side of the Treadmill: You Know You’ve Done it

Thud thud thud zzzzzzzzzz That all too familiar treadmill water break turned into a, well, longer break.

Standing on the sides of the treadmill is a pretty common thing, especially if you’re pushing yourself a little too hard. It’s not like stopping to walk outside or walking your bike outside because with those, you account for the break.

With that step back onto the moving ground, you’ve lied to yourself. Or at least I do. The treadmill might say I ran 6.2 miles in an hour but it really should say ran 6.07 and hung out for .13 miles.

This brings up a difficult dilemma: should I pause the treadmill during my breaks and have to wait for it to start up or should or watch the treadmill run underneath me and feel like I’m cheating myself? Both are far from ideal. Waiting for the treadmill to reach it’s full speed again, even though it may only take a few seconds, can seem like a lifetime when you have your music pumping and you are ready to go.

Personally, I’m a side-rider. When I need a break, I take it. My stats may be a little off, but hey, no one is perfect.

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Are you a side stander or a pauser? …And don’t say neither. Even the best of triathletes tires out once in awhile.

Stay Classy YoungTri,

TJ

Triathlon Business International: ActiveX Fun Fitness Challenge!

The Triathlon Business International Conference has been GREAT so far! This morning, at the crack of dawn, I headed up to the roof of the hotel for one of the four workout options (there were also swims, bikes, and runs) — the ActiveX Fitness Challenge.

Attendees were split into two groups, and we did an INTENSE and fun 30 minute circuit workout! It included planks, burpees, situps, squats, work with bands, jumping over a pole, and throwing 25 lb sand medicine balls down and squatting. I was sweating a ton by the end — haha.

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The group of TBI Attendees at the Active X Fun Fitness Challenge!

My friend Beth (I worked for her when I was a freshman in HS!!!) with HUUB did the workout too!

My friend Beth (I worked for her when I was a freshman in HS!!!) with HUUB did the workout too!

The views from the rooftop of the hotel were Spectacular — the sunrise was gorgeous and Los Angeles was visible nearby.

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AMAZING Sunrise after the workout!

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after the workout!

Do you enjoy circuit workouts?!

Tri Hard,

Caity

 

 

 

Speed, Setbacks, and More: Jacob’s Top Four Tri Tips

Here are some tips from YoungTri Ambassador Jacob Bremer, student at University of Michigan and member of the University of Michigan triathlon team, has learned over the past few years:

Jacob is a Member of the University of Michigan Triathlon Team!

Jacob is a Member of the University of Michigan Triathlon Team!

1. Do not neglect speed work. Even at the Olympic distance people think of it as such a long event they often completely neglect speed work, which is crucial for (especially in running) keeping good form. Once a week, do a little warm up then head to a track or somewhere with an open space and do 6-8 150-200 all our sprints (about 25-40 second depending on distance and ability). They give your body muscle memory of its most efficient form and help develop speed which you may need to call upon at the that finish line someday!

2. If you’re on a bike trainer during the winter, don’t spend countless hours on a trainer at a steady state. While long rides are still important to accomplish, I find it more appealing to raise intensity and lower volume during the harsh winters I have in my home state of Michigan. That way I’m getting just as good of workouts and don’t get burned out from sitting on a trainer all winter.

3. Have a plan! Even if it’s just to do something every day. That’s still a plan. You’d be surprised how much more you’re committed when you just simply write things down!

4. Don’t look as a bump in the road as a setback. Look for other opportunities within it. Last year I suffered a contusion in my knee, which put me out of cycling and running for nearly 6 weeks. I thought my life was over, but I ended up just concentrating on my swim, which I ended up taking over 3 minutes off my swim time in just those six weeks. With every setback, there’s an opportunity for a comeback.

Jacob's first career win!

Jacob’s first career win!

A little bit more about Jacob, from Jacob:

I am junior with Education Major at the University of Michigan. I am excited about being able to give back to a sport that has given so much to me and being able to spread your passion with others who are passionate about identical things. In addition to competing on the University of Michigan triathlon team, I am also an assistant coach at a local high school for the cross country/track teams. I began triathlons two years ago coming from a serious running background. In high school I played ran cross country, track, and played basketball.

Women’s Triathlon = Officially a NCAA Division 1 Emerging Sport!

As of today, women’s triathlon has been OFFICIALLY approved as a NCAA Division 1 Emerging Sport!!! Today, the vote received over 95% support from the NCAA Division 1 Legislative Council.

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Thanks to all the YoungTri members who signed the petition to show their support!

From usatriathlon.org:

“Today is a watershed moment for the sport,” said Rob Urbach, USA Triathlon CEO. “After four years of hard work behind the scenes, this announcement represents a huge victory for current and future student-athletes, for the NCAA member institutions that will operate varsity triathlon programs, and for USA Triathlon’s future Olympic success.”

Read more from USAT here.

Can’t wait to follow NCAA triathlon as it grows over the years!

Are you excited about this new development?!

Tri Hard,

Caity